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2 Angry Buds – July 2014 Edition

 

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy – for everyone but the Angry Buds, of course, who have been hard at work to bring you ‘campfire’ horror stories about some of the recent decisions by our SCOTUS! They also want to warn you about more of the outrageous primary candidates still plaguing our cities and states – last month’s list was insufficient, apparently! And they want all of you to call your Senators regarding S.J. Res. 19, the antidote to Citizens United currently being considered. So, get your phones out right now!

2 Angry Buds – June 2014 Edition

 

The Angry Buds, while serenaded by an insistent disgruntled pet, discuss the surprising outcome of various U.S. primaries and the E.U.’s vote, the mess at the Veterans Administration, the attempt to rollback Citizen’s United, and the hoopla surrounding the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.  Yes, by ignoring the whole mess in Iraq, they hope it will go away . . .

2 Angry Buds – May 2014 Edition

 

 

In spite of the beautiful weather, the Angry Buds are back and ornery as ever. Irritations this month are plentiful, including “Dr.” Karl Rove offering non-expert medical opinions, the grating double standard society applies to women, and two recent disastrous Supreme Court decisions. Their discussion, as always, gets further revved up with forays into the FCC’s abysmal decision regarding prioritized internet service, the war against the poor (not to be confused with the War on Poverty which turns 50 this year), minimum wage increases of the distant future (with a helpful trip down memory lane for comparison), Georgia’s nitwit legislature, and the elusive smart gun – which will apparently remain so, thanks to the NRA’s yahoo membership. In the inimitable words of Firesign Theatre, our country is quickly heading “Forward into the past!”

 

Participatory Democracy Alert: Be sure to have your laptop loaded, as we urge you to send your angry missive to the FCC, demanding equal internet speeds for all!   Click here to participate in your democracy!

2 Angry Buds – July 2014 Edition

 

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy – for everyone but the Angry Buds, of course, who have been hard at work to bring you ‘campfire’ horror stories about some of the recent decisions by our SCOTUS! They also want to warn you about more of the outrageous primary candidates still plaguing our cities and states – last month’s list was insufficient, apparently! And they want all of you to call your Senators regarding S.J. Res. 19, the antidote to Citizens United currently being considered. So, get your phones out right now!

2 Angry Buds – June 2014 Edition

 

The Angry Buds, while serenaded by an insistent disgruntled pet, discuss the surprising outcome of various U.S. primaries and the E.U.’s vote, the mess at the Veterans Administration, the attempt to rollback Citizen’s United, and the hoopla surrounding the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.  Yes, by ignoring the whole mess in Iraq, they hope it will go away . . .

2 Angry Buds – May 2014 Edition

 

 

In spite of the beautiful weather, the Angry Buds are back and ornery as ever. Irritations this month are plentiful, including “Dr.” Karl Rove offering non-expert medical opinions, the grating double standard society applies to women, and two recent disastrous Supreme Court decisions. Their discussion, as always, gets further revved up with forays into the FCC’s abysmal decision regarding prioritized internet service, the war against the poor (not to be confused with the War on Poverty which turns 50 this year), minimum wage increases of the distant future (with a helpful trip down memory lane for comparison), Georgia’s nitwit legislature, and the elusive smart gun – which will apparently remain so, thanks to the NRA’s yahoo membership. In the inimitable words of Firesign Theatre, our country is quickly heading “Forward into the past!”

 

Participatory Democracy Alert: Be sure to have your laptop loaded, as we urge you to send your angry missive to the FCC, demanding equal internet speeds for all!   Click here to participate in your democracy!

Terry Taylor-6-17-14

Learning from ‘The Troubles’ in Northern Ireland by Terry Taylor

Talk presented by Mr. Terry Taylor, Interfaith Paths to Peace, at the April 2014 “Third Thursday” Luncheon Program at The Rudyard Kipling

For several decades beginning in the late 1960′s the citizens of Northern Ireland endured a bloody civil war between Catholics and Protestants. The violence included terror bombings, kidnappings and assassinations. Today the war is over . . . but they don’t yet have peace. In his talk Terry Taylor describes his visit to that country in October 2013, and shares what he learned about how the citizens of Northern Ireland are struggling to get past their history of violence amid the animosities that still linger. He also details the similarities and differences between the Irish struggle and the violence in Louisville’s streets.

Terry is Executive Director of Louisville-based Interfaith Paths to Peace and the author of the 2009 book, A Spirituality for Brokenness.

Visit Interfaith Paths to Peace at www.paths2peace.org.

Follow Terry Taylor on Facebook and on twitter @interfaithterry.

To view the video of this talk, please click here,

 

Recorded live on April 17, 2014 at The Rudyard Kipling, Louisville, Kentucky.

2 Angry Buds – April 2014 Edition

 

Mel & Vic return to celebrate the first anniversary of their inaugural show!  Their discussion begins with the Russia-Ukraine standoff (complete with sound effects supplied by aircraft arriving for the Louisville Air Show) and the ludicrous response to it by some notable legislators, then touches on the NSA monitoring program, scary climate change, the Supreme Court’s obnoxious ruling on McCutcheon, and the potentially catastrophic Comcast-Time Warner merger.

But things haven’t been all bad – March 2014 was the first month since 2007 that there were no American combat deaths in Afghanistan.  So, celebrate for just a moment, then get out there, yell and be heard!  Life as we once knew it appears headed for annihilation — but are any of us truly surprised?!

The Forsooth Hour – April 2014

Alex Bradshaw interviews Cara Cooper, Environmental Activist

 Cara Cooper

Welcome to another edition of the FORsooth Hour – where we give time and space to individuals working towards social, economic, and environmental justice. Alex Bradshaw hosts this edition, talking with Lexington, Kentucky activist Cara Cooper.

Ms. Cooper is the state organizer of the Kentucky Student Environmental Coalition. She earned her Masters degree in Environmental Science from Florida International University. She is a frequent contributor to the FORsooth newspaper in Louisville, Kentucky. Her most recent contribution is an article in the April edition titled “Action Needed to Counter Misinformation About Climate Change.” In the interview, Ms. Cooper discusses why this is necessary and much more.

For more information about the Kentucky Student Environmental Coalition (KSEC), or to contact the organization, please visit their website:   http://www.kystudentenvironmentalcoalition.org/

To contact Ms. Cooper directly for more information or to schedule an environmental road show, email her at:  ksec.cara@seac.org

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Alex Bradshaw is an editor with FORsooth Newspaper. Alex is also a co-founder of Louisville’s NO BORDERS Radical Lending Library. He has been published in the periodical Perspectives in Anarchist Theory and Z Magazine. Alex also works as an occupational therapist in community health care with individuals with traumatic brain injuries. You can reach Alex at alexbrad11@hotmail.com.

 

Carla Wallace Speaks About Racial Violence

 Carla Wallace Talks with Brian Arbenz About Racial Violence,

Some of its Causes and Potential for Healing in Our Community

CarlaWallace

 

Carla Wallace grew up on a farm in Oldham County, Kentucky and in Amsterdam, Netherlands.  She has been engaged in social justice work for more than 30 years, having worked closely with Louisville’s Anne Braden.  She led a successful effort in 1999 as part of the Fairness Campaign to include sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes under Louisville’s Human Rights Ordinance. In 2002 she was arrested for protesting the fatal police shooting in Louisville of a handcuffed man. The Late activist Anne Braden has called Ms. Wallace one of the best civil rights organizers Louisville produced in the 20th century.  In 2007, she was inducted into the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights Hall of Fame.  In 2009, she was honored for her achievements as a long-time leader of Louisville’s LGBT civil rights and anti-racist movements, and co-founder of the Fairness Campaign, by leading the annual Kentuckiana Pride Festival Parade through downtown Louisville as Grand Marshall.

Ms. Wallace is co-founder of both Louisville’s Fairness Campaign and the recently formed Louisville Showing Up for Racial Justice (website: SURJ). She believes we will not solve any of our problems without lifting up the interconnections between all the issues before us, including immigrant rights, war, economic, environmental and health justice.

To see the video of this interview:  http://youtu.be/bKTieTLMaeA

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Brian Arbenz, formerly known as George Morrison, is Editor Emeritus of FORsooth Newspaper.  Contact him at  cyw_us@yahoo.com 

We’re Bringing Community Radio to Louisville!

 

 

 

Ruth Newman, a founding member of our low-power FM radio team, provides a brief synopsis of our plan to create a community radio station, FORward Radio, that empowers people who are under-represented on the airwaves.  We seek individuals to create and broadcast programs on topics and events under-discussed in mainstream media, with a focus on social justice and creative resolution of community challenges.

Come join us — we want your ideas and your programming!

Contact us:  wforwardradio@gmail.com  or  forwardradio-louisville@gmail.com

 

 

On Becoming a Journalist

 

GCM-headshot

 

Gretchen Morgenson began her career as an editorial assistant at Vogue magazine and is currently assistant business and financial editor and a columnist at The New York Times.  In this address to the Miami University Public Relations Student Society of America, she reminds her audience that every job can provide a valuable learning experience, no matter how far off one’s expected career path it may be.

Ms. Morgenson has covered the world financial markets for the Times since May 1998 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for her “trenchant and incisive” beat reporting on Wall Street.  In addition to the Pulitzer Prize, she has also received two Gerald Loeb awards for her outstanding journalism.  Her interests in the financial world developed when she was a stock broker at Dean Witter Reynolds, learning about Wall Street from the inside.  In the past, she has written for Money Magazine and Forbes, and even enjoyed a brief foray into politics when she served as Steve Forbes’ Press Secretary during his bid to become the Republican nominee for President of the United States.   She is the co-author, with Joshua Rosner, of Reckless Endangerment, a New York Times bestseller published in 2011 that chronicles the origins of the 2008 financial crisis.

 

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Recorded on March 17, 2014 at the Harry T. Wilks Theatre in the Armstrong Student Center, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio.  Sponsored by the Miami University Public Relations Student Society of America. 

Ken Clay-Merv Auspine

Looking Back at Two Centuries of Black Louisville

Looking Back at Two Centuries of Black Louisville

Kenneth Clay and Mervin Aubespin

Guest speakers, Ken Clay and Merv Aubespin, are co-authors, with the late J. Blaine Hudson, of Two Centuries of Black Louisville: A Photographic History, published in 2011.  Mr. Clay discusses the vibrant history of Louisville’s Walnut Street corridor (now Muhammad Ali Boulevard) which was home to Black Louisville’s business, legal, professional and social institutions, as well as the heart, soul and pulse of the African-American community during segregation.  Mr. Aubespin focuses on the civil rights struggle in Louisville and his role during this period of unrest as the first African-American journalist with The Courier-Journal.

Mervin Aubespin,  Photo by Durell Hall, Jr.

Merv Aubespin became the first African American hired as a news artist by the Courier-Journal in 1967. A year later, when racial violence broke out in Louisville, he was pressed into service as a reporter, enabling the paper to cover a major breaking story when there were almost no African Americans in the newsroom.  He was later named associate editor for development to assist in finding minority journalists for jobs with the paper.  As past president of the National Association of Black Journalists, Mr. Aubespin was responsible for the growth of NABJ into a major force in American journalism.  The Aubespin Scholarship was named in his honor by the American Copy Editors Society (ACES).  He won the prestigious Ida B. Wells Award for his efforts in opening opportunities for minorities in journalism. He is the founder and twice past president of the Louisville Association of Black Communicators, as well as former chairman of the minorities committee of the American Society of Newspaper Editors.  Mr. Aubespin won the Distinguished Service to Journalism Award, given by the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communications, in 1991. He was named to the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1995 and was the first recipient of the Association of Black Colleges of Journalism and Mass Communication’s highest award, named in his honor.  In 2010, he received Louisville’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Award.

KenClay

Ken Clay is an entrepreneur, cultural event producer and retired vice president of the Kentucky Center for the Arts.  He grew up in Louisville, Kentucky, and in the 1960′s he opened the Corner of Jazz, the first African American culture shop in Louisville. In 1978, Mr. Clay co-founded the Renaissance Development Corporation, a cultural arts administrative organization that promoted black art and culture in Kentucky. Mr. Clay joined the staff of the Kentucky Center for the Arts as Director of Cultural Diversity in 1983 and remained there for more than 21 years. He received the Chicago Kuumba Theater’s 1993 Liberation Award for presenting African-American artists and the 1999 Governor’s Community Arts Award.   Mr. Clay continues to have a profound impact on the development and exposure of the talents of African American artists in Louisville and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

BlaineHudson

Prior to his death in 2013, J. Blaine Hudson was a civil rights activist, author, and dean of the University of Louisville College of Arts and Sciences.  Dr. Hudson joined the Department of Pan-African Studies in 1992 and directed the Pan-African Institute for Teachers until 1998. Dr. Hudson then served as chair of the department until 2003 while also serving as Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Hudson was later selected as the Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences in 2005. Dr. Hudson published two other books, Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in the Kentucky Borderland and Encyclopedia of the Underground Railroad.   He served on the standing committee for Cultural Diversity and Research Universities for the Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences.  He also served on the Board of Directors of the Muhammad Ali Center, as chair of the Kentucky African American Heritage Commission, and as chair of the Kentucky State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.  He leaves a legacy of activism, teaching, scholarship, community service, leadership and integrity.

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Recorded live February 20, 2014, at the Third Thursday Luncheon at The Rudyard Kipling and presented by the Fellowship of Reconciliation and Interfaith Paths to Peace.

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